The Point of No Return

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In the past twenty years, over 25 million refugees have returned ‘home’. These refugee repatriations are considered by the international community to be the only real means of solving mass refugee crises. Yet despite the importance placed on repatriation—both in principle and practice—there has been very little exploration of the political controversies that have framed refugee return. Several questions remain unresolved: do refugees have a right to refuse return? How can you remake citizenship after exile? Is ‘home’ a place or a community? How should the liberal principles be balanced against nationalist state order?

The Point of No Return: Rights, Refugees and Repatriation sets out to answer these questions and to examine the fundamental tensions between liberalism and nationalism that repatriation exposes. It makes clear that repatriation cannot be considered as a mere act of border-crossing, a physical moment of ‘return’. Instead, repatriation must be recognised to be a complex political process, involving the remaking of a relationship between citizen and state, the recreation of a social contract.

A comprehensive and highly original analysis of refugee repatriation from a historical, political and philosophical perspective. Essential reading for policymakers, practitioners and academics with an interest in humanitarian action.

Dr Jeff Crisp, Senior Director for Policy and Advocacy, Refugees International